ILC Faculty Notes

 

The awards, accomplishments, speaking engagements and news of the distinguished faculty of the Insurance Law Center at the University of Connecticut School of Law: 

Peter Lindseth to Speak in Utrecht
Mar 11, 2019 -

Professor Peter Lindseth will speak on March 21, 2019, at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. His talk will be entitled "In the Shadow of Threatened Enforcement: Compliance and the Public-Private Divide in the U.S." The lecture was organized by RENFORCE, the Utrecht Centre for Regulation and Enforcement in Europe.

Jessica Rubin Appointed to AALS Animal Law Board
Jan 11, 2019 -

Professor Jessica Rubin has been elected to the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law Schools' Section on Animal Law. Rubin was elected at the association's annual conference on January 6, 2019.

Alexandra Lahav to Speak at AALS Meeting
Jan 3, 2019 -

Professor Alexander Lahav will speak as part of a panel at the Association of American Law Schools' annual meeting on January 5, 2019. The panel on which she is speaking, titled "Jurisprudence Panel 2: Recognizing Wrongs: Philosophy of Tort Law" is part of a five-day event. The convention will take place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel. 

Jessica Rubin to Give Yale Lecture
Dec 7, 2018 -

Professor Jessica Rubin will give a presentation at the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics on January 24, 2019 about her role in establishing Desmond's Law in Connecticut. Desmond's Law is the first in the country that allows judges to appoint advocates on behalf of animals in cases of abuse or neglect.

Alexandra Lahav Among Professors in First Circuit Amicus
Nov 26, 2018 -

Professor Alexandra Lahav was among law professors who filed an amicus brief on November 20, 2018, asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit to reconsider its decision to decertify a class in the Asacol antitrust case. A district court in Massachusetts had certified a class of buyers of the drug Asacol, which is used to treat ulcerative colitis. These buyers had alleged an antitrust conspiracy to block less expensive generic alternatives from the shelves. The appeals court decertified the class on the grounds that a small percentage, estimated at no more than 10 percent of the class members, would have bought Asacol out of brand loyalty even if a cheaper alternative had been available. The law professors argued that "Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure does not compel a court to prohibit class actions whenever a small percentage of the class may not have suffered actual damages."

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